I need your story for a Fun-tastic Christmas podcast episode

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Hi y’all

I’m making a Christmas episode of the podcast and I need your help. Yes, YOU. The person reading this right now. Don’t look around, I’m talking to you~!
As serious, devoted education professionals, we all love hearing about things going wrong or weird in a lesson, so the end-of-year episode is going to be a collection of funny stories from the classroom. I’ve already recorded a few with the recent interviewees. If you’d like to contribute, I’d love to have your story.
They don’t have to be long at all. One I have already is just a teacher leaning against the classroom door and falling straight through it! Short n sweet. But longer ones are good too. If you have more than one that’s even better.
So, any mishaps, odd co-workers, weird or funny experiences, just record yourself telling the story (just on your phone is good enough!) and send it to mastersoftesol@gmail.com
If you want to be anonymous, that’s fine, otherwise you a can give your name at the start.
Cheers
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13 – What the way you speak says about you – Sociolinguistics with Andrew Euan MacFarlane

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MOT 6 - brain 1400

 

This episode, we start with a little experiment and get more interactive. Let us know what country you thought the music originated in at @MOTcast with the hashtag #motesol . I’ll put up the results on www.mastersoftesol.com

Andrew Ewan MacFarlane is a lecturer at University of York in the Department of Language and Linguistic Science and a sociolinguist. We spent a while flipping back and forth between accents and dialects, reminiscing about Margaret Thatcher, thinking about unobtrusive kiwis and kangaroos, gettin’ daaaan wit da yoof o’ London innit, and playing “Name That [Country of Origin] Tune”.

This was one of my favourite interviews so far and hopefully inspires more than a few listeners to get deeper into the subject.

Footnotes:

Margaret Thatcher’s voice – before and after

Multicultural London English

MOT on Instagram

12 – Babies and First Language Acquisition – Tamar Keren-Portnoy pt1

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MOT 6 - brain 1400

@MOTcast

Now on Instagram!

Once again, I got lost in the labyrinthian corridors of the University of York Language & Linguistic Science department, this time to speak to Tamar Keren-Portnoy about first language acquisition. There’s a lot of similarities between how we learn our first language and how we acquire our second language, so it’s a useful topic for ESL / EFL / second language teachers.

She gives us insights into such things as how babies develop syntax/grammar norms, why they learn some words earlier than others, how babies are not simply mimicking their caretakers and, through her own research with Rory DePaolis & Marilyn Vihman, how babies learn through listening and the sounds they themselves make.

You may remember Marilyn Vihman from episode 9 of MOT.

Later in the year, I’ll release a mini-episode about the developmental stages of babies.

Links:

Marilyn Vihman Interview on MOT

“Travel Broadens the Mind” – Campos et al (2000)

 

Key words: baby, babies, acquisition, teaching, learning, babbling, language, babbling, cooing,

 

 

11 – Too old to learn? The Critical Period – Heather Marsden

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MOT critical period

This episode, I speak to University of York’s Heather Marsden about the controversial Critical Period hypothesis. This theory suggests that there is a limited age at which we can learn a second language, after which it grows increasingly difficult. Anecdotally, we assume this to be true – kids are sponges for language while older people struggle – but what does the research say about this?

This episode is simply a bite-sized introduction to a much larger topic, so I encourage you to search around for other perspectives on this subject.

Heather Marsden @ University of York

Follow me on @MOTcast

Now on Instagram!

Noob glossary:

L1 – first/native language

L2 – second language

input – any exposure to the L2

interference – where the L1 grammar, vocab or pronunciation affects or negatively influences L2 production

 

Adele Listening Activity – (Intermediate and above)

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Time: 50 minutes

This listening activity uses “Someone Like You” as a listening activity. There are TWO aspects to this.

  1. The verses and the bridge are fill-in-the-gaps
  2. The choruses are “correct the wrong words” activity. Some of the words on the student sheet are incorrect and students need to listen closely to find which.

Followed by the questions and activities from the lesson plan.

Click the link below for the lesson plan and answer sheet.

Adele Lyrics Gap and Guess

 

Would you rather…? Ice Breaker – (Upper Intermediate / Advanced)

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Time: 10+ minutes

A fun ice breaker using “Would you rather A or B?”. It’s deliberately silly and the classes have had loads of fun with it over the years. It needs to be set up and demonstrated along with giving some rules (I.E., you MUST choose one option / if the choice is “completely bald” then they are not allowed to ‘get hair implants’ later! / and so on).

Partners (A & B) have different questions. Students can start to expand it and add their own questions.

FOR SOME MORE CONSERVATIVE TEACHING CULTURES, SOME OF THE QUESTIONS MAY BE ON THE EDGY SIDE.

Click the link below.

Would you rather A B

Movie Music Activity – (Intermediate & Advanced)

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Time: 60 mins +

This lesson plan uses incidental movie music to activate students’ schema to write a movie scene (Intermediate) or a movie plot (Advanced). This can be adapted to your learning goals (focus on vivid language/adjective/action words/dialogue/tenses) and the level of your learners. Ideal for students that are creative or are getting bored of the usual ESL classes.

Click the link below for the lesson.

Movie Music Story Lesson Plan