08 – English as a Lingua Franca in the ESL classroom – Martin Dewey

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[This episode follows up on issues first covered in episode 4 with Jennifer Jenkins.]

English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) is a perplexing thing. It’s not an approach. It’s not a methodology. It’s a perspective. So there’s nothing for teachers to really get solid a grip on. This can get frustrating for teachers and can leave us more confused than enlightened.

In this episode, Martin Dewey of King’s College London towels off this slippery subject with a classroom perspective. Rethink how much attention we give certain language aspects in our classes, moving away from the native speaker norm, focusing on how students adapt their speech for the specific situation.

M’Kay…

Due to the time difference, I was up at dawn for this Skype interview so I was a little sleepy and, yes, I do say “curriculums” at one point!

If you like the show, SUBSCRIBE! Questions, comments, requests to…

@MOTcast

www.masterofTESOL.com

Further reading:

V.O.I.C.E  – Vienna Oxford International Corpus of English

“Understanding English as a Lingua Franca” on Amazon

“Exploring ELF” on Amazon

Martin Dewey’s Research

Jennifer Jenkins on Amazon

07 – Why your ESL lesson bombed – Tom Randolph

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In this episode we hear from TESOL methodology trainer Tom Randolph about some of the reasons ESL / EFL lessons don’t succeed, and how to avoid it happening. I chip in with my own experience as a teacher trainer based on the classes I have monitored that didn’t go well.

There’re plenty of solid tips and even activity ideas in this conversation, so there’s something for everyone, regardless of experience.

I’d love to hear your ideas too. Don’t be shy!

@MOTcast

www.mastersofTESOL.com

 

06 – The ESL / EFL student brain and how we learn – Stephen van Vlack

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As teachers, we need to be aware of how students are learning. Different brain systems need to work together in order to retain information and, most importantly, integrate it into existing systems. So, what is the best approach for teachers to give the best chance for students to improve? Stephen van Vlack slices open the brain (metaphorically) to show us how the different brain systems interact and the most effective ways for students to improve.

This is one of the more difficult subjects we’ve tackled on MOT, but Stephen breaks it down into an understandable view of how information and perception affects language learning and retention. Read the rest of this entry »

06a – Extra Interview on How ESL / EFL students learn – Stephen van Vlack

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Here’s another 8 minutes from Stephen van Vlack on how the brain works when we learn – or perceive – new things, including how learning a second language affects the native language.

05 – How to teach English intonation – Dorothy Chun

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One of the most overlooked elements of teaching spoken language is intonation. Yet it’s extremely important for conveying meaning. Traditional methods of teaching intonation tended to be simple listen-and-repest drills.

Our guest for this episode, Prof. Dorothy Chun, has researched using visualisation to teach intonation, where students are able to see the contours of a native speaker and compare it to their own production.

I spoke to Dorothy Chun over Skype, defying the 16-hour time difference, to get the expert opinion on the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of teaching intonation.

If you never do any intonation practice, this will be a useful guide for how to introduce it to your classes.

@MOTcast

www.mastersofTESOL.com

Dorothy Chun

PRAAT Visualization software (free) (Windows and Mac)

Jazz Chants

Language and Colour Boundaries/Perception – blue or green, and how red is your wine?

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The whole “blue/black-white/gold” dress photo that’s been doing the rounds in the last week or so reminded me of a very interesting point about language and perception of color.

As the dress debate went global and multilingual, perhaps not all of the disagreement on the colours may be down to how an individual’s brain is interpreting light information from the eyes. For decades, linguists have gone back and forth over whether the names for colours affect how we perceive them.

“When the orange, orange robin goes bob, bob, bobbin’ along…”

Think about it: red wine, red hair, robin red breast – these are all colour-specific descriptions that are inaccurate at best. Or, at least, they’re inaccurate now. Just a few centuries ago, “orange” as a range on the colour spectrum was simply part of “red” without a named colour category of its own. White wine, black eye… there are many examples in everyday language where the description of colour clearly doesn’t match the reality.

Read the rest of this entry »

04 – Questioning the Native English Norm in English Teaching – Jennifer Jenkins

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English as a Lingua Franca – ELF – is English as a shared language (usually) between non-native speakers.

As English becomes more and more globalised, we question whether the Native Speaker model should be the goal in the classroom. Prof. Jennifer Jenkins first broached this idea back in 2000 and was met with excitement and resistance.

Read the rest of this entry »

Build the suspense in team activities

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I’m currently teaching at an intensive winter camp for adults. Each week there is an activity where the groups should break into teams and complete a series of activities, often in different locations on campus.

As this requires scores to be consolidated from different locations, I hit on the idea of how to do this in the most efficient way, whilst simultaneously keeping the students involved and excited.

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03 – Effective Feedback on Writing – Ahmar Mahboob

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Hands up if you’ve been properly trained on giving feedback on students’ writing… Yep, not many of us.

Ahmar Mahboob gives a valuable insight into the most effective approach. Below are some links where you can get a more in depth look at his approaches. Is peer assessment any good? How and when should we focus on grammar?

Read the rest of this entry »

The dangers of committing to one technology in the classroom – Evernote’s Penultimate

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In the modern classroom, there can’t be many of us who only use the white/blackboard and the textbook for every lesson. To a greater or lesser extent, the convenience and liberating nature of the digital age has become part of our classroom workflow. For more than two years now, I have shunned the board and used Penultimate (since bought by Evernote) on an iPad, put through the VGA connection to the projector. It was great, basically like a digital board where I could write but have other media baked in too. I had all my textbook pages scanned in there, I could write on the scans and add new blank pages for corrections. It had this great ‘drift’ feature that allowed you to zoom in and the zoom focus would follow at the speed you wrote. Best of all, what was projected was just the page itself, so no one in class could see me changing pens/colours or zooming in for the drift. It wasn’t perfect, but it was easily the best of the ten-or-so note apps I’ve used. You notice I am using the past tense here. Unexpectedly, a few weeks ago, the app was updated. With the new changes, Evernote didn’t so much drop the ball as jettison it directly into the sun. Read the rest of this entry »