learning

20 – using TED talks (and other videos) in ESL EFL class – Roger Fusselman

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I caught up with Roger Fusselman after his KOTESOL conference presentation on using TED talks and videos in general for language teaching. This is a MUST listen for anyone using visual media in the classroom.

We cover the DOs and DON’Ts of choosing videos as well as his principles of using media:

Challenge / Meaningful / Support / Choice / Integration (connecting ideas) / Variety / Application

Video Sites referenced:

http://www.ted.com/talks

http://bigthink.com/

http://www.ideacity.ca/watch-talks/

Specific videos referenced:

How to start a movement

Power poses for confidence

 

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18 – Discourse Markers – Jon Campbell-Larsen

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Well, discourse markers are kinda a feature of, like, natural speech in, you know, basically every language. Jon Campbell-Larsen takes us through the how and why of teaching Discourse Markers. Here is a link to an example of how to scaffold students practicing these markers (based on Jon’s KOTESOL hand out). Feel free to adapt it for your own classes.

Discourse Markers HO2

Keywords: ESL, EFL, TESOL, TEFL, CELTA, DELTA, discourse markers, discourse, markers, linguistics, language, second language, teaching, learning, English, bilingual, multilingual, cognition, students, education,

KOTESOL upload coming soon!

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Hello to the people who attended my KOTESOL pronunciation workshop. I’ve managed to upload the colour vowel chart already. I’ll be uploading the video and the materials and ideas after the insanity of midterm grading has subsided. So check back soon!

How can learners FEEL pronunciation?

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Vowels are the most difficult of the phonemes to teach. Consonants generally don’t differ that much between language and, crucially, consonants have things touch – tongue between the teeth, bottom lip on the teeth etc – which makes it easier to describe to students. Vowels on the other hand have anything in the mouth making contact with another part. This makes it difficult to explain to students. Of course, we have the classic ‘mouth map’ that we can show students but that seems quite academic.

Students get a much better sense of where vowel sounds are produced using the colour chart attached below. Having two words that students can practice gives them double the chance to FEEL where the sounds are produced. The left side is the front of the mouth, the right is the back of the throat.

However, even when practicing, students are frequently sat closer to their partner, speaking softly. This is not good for FEELING where a vowel is being produced. For that, we need VOLUME.

Solution 1: separating out the students. Get them at opposite ends of the classroom having to speak to their partners. The extra volume necessary helps them to concentrate on where the sound is coming from, using the colour chart.

Solution 2: if you don’t have space – play music. The extra volume will force the students to speak up.

A loud classroom is a productive classroom.

The colour chart is not mine, so I’ve put the source on the bottom of the chart.Colour vowel chart image

16 – Eytan Zweig – what words really mean – semantics and pragmatics

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Plurals are easy, right? There’s one or there’s more than one… pretty straight forward. “All”, “every”, “All the” “each” – that’s pretty simple too, isn’t it? Well, hold on to something sturdy as Eytan Zweig gets you to think a little deeper about how we both form and understand language.

The literal meaning (semantics) and the meaning of the use (pragmatics) of the language is a vital part of how we communicate in real life. So, let’s a show like this is chomping at the bit to dig down into this topic.

 

Keywords: ESL, EFL, TESOL, TEFL, CELTA, DELTA, pragmatics, semantics, linguistics, language, second language, teaching, learning, English, Israeli, Hebrew, bilingual, mulitlingual,  York, University of York, UK, England, cognition, Eytan Zweig,

I need your story for a Fun-tastic Christmas podcast episode

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Hi y’all

I’m making a Christmas episode of the podcast and I need your help. Yes, YOU. The person reading this right now. Don’t look around, I’m talking to you~!
As serious, devoted education professionals, we all love hearing about things going wrong or weird in a lesson, so the end-of-year episode is going to be a collection of funny stories from the classroom. I’ve already recorded a few with the recent interviewees. If you’d like to contribute, I’d love to have your story.
They don’t have to be long at all. One I have already is just a teacher leaning against the classroom door and falling straight through it! Short n sweet. But longer ones are good too. If you have more than one that’s even better.
So, any mishaps, odd co-workers, weird or funny experiences, just record yourself telling the story (just on your phone is good enough!) and send it to mastersoftesol@gmail.com
If you want to be anonymous, that’s fine, otherwise you a can give your name at the start.
Cheers

12 – Babies and First Language Acquisition – Tamar Keren-Portnoy pt1

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@MOTcast

Now on Instagram!

Once again, I got lost in the labyrinthian corridors of the University of York Language & Linguistic Science department, this time to speak to Tamar Keren-Portnoy about first language acquisition. There’s a lot of similarities between how we learn our first language and how we acquire our second language, so it’s a useful topic for ESL / EFL / second language teachers.

She gives us insights into such things as how babies develop syntax/grammar norms, why they learn some words earlier than others, how babies are not simply mimicking their caretakers and, through her own research with Rory DePaolis & Marilyn Vihman, how babies learn through listening and the sounds they themselves make.

You may remember Marilyn Vihman from episode 9 of MOT.

Later in the year, I’ll release a mini-episode about the developmental stages of babies.

Links:

Marilyn Vihman Interview on MOT

“Travel Broadens the Mind” – Campos et al (2000)

 

Key words: baby, babies, acquisition, teaching, learning, babbling, language, babbling, cooing,