learning

16 – Eytan Zweig – what words really mean – semantics and pragmatics

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Plurals are easy, right? There’s one or there’s more than one… pretty straight forward. “All”, “every”, “All the” “each” – that’s pretty simple too, isn’t it? Well, hold on to something sturdy as Eytan Zweig gets you to think a little deeper about how we both form and understand language.

The literal meaning (semantics) and the meaning of the use (pragmatics) of the language is a vital part of how we communicate in real life. So, let’s a show like this is chomping at the bit to dig down into this topic.

 

Keywords: ESL, EFL, TESOL, TEFL, CELTA, DELTA, pragmatics, semantics, linguistics, language, second language, teaching, learning, English, Israeli, Hebrew, bilingual, mulitlingual,  York, University of York, UK, England, cognition, Eytan Zweig,

I need your story for a Fun-tastic Christmas podcast episode

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Hi y’all

I’m making a Christmas episode of the podcast and I need your help. Yes, YOU. The person reading this right now. Don’t look around, I’m talking to you~!
As serious, devoted education professionals, we all love hearing about things going wrong or weird in a lesson, so the end-of-year episode is going to be a collection of funny stories from the classroom. I’ve already recorded a few with the recent interviewees. If you’d like to contribute, I’d love to have your story.
They don’t have to be long at all. One I have already is just a teacher leaning against the classroom door and falling straight through it! Short n sweet. But longer ones are good too. If you have more than one that’s even better.
So, any mishaps, odd co-workers, weird or funny experiences, just record yourself telling the story (just on your phone is good enough!) and send it to mastersoftesol@gmail.com
If you want to be anonymous, that’s fine, otherwise you a can give your name at the start.
Cheers

12 – Babies and First Language Acquisition – Tamar Keren-Portnoy pt1

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MOT 6 - brain 1400

@MOTcast

Now on Instagram!

Once again, I got lost in the labyrinthian corridors of the University of York Language & Linguistic Science department, this time to speak to Tamar Keren-Portnoy about first language acquisition. There’s a lot of similarities between how we learn our first language and how we acquire our second language, so it’s a useful topic for ESL / EFL / second language teachers.

She gives us insights into such things as how babies develop syntax/grammar norms, why they learn some words earlier than others, how babies are not simply mimicking their caretakers and, through her own research with Rory DePaolis & Marilyn Vihman, how babies learn through listening and the sounds they themselves make.

You may remember Marilyn Vihman from episode 9 of MOT.

Later in the year, I’ll release a mini-episode about the developmental stages of babies.

Links:

Marilyn Vihman Interview on MOT

“Travel Broadens the Mind” – Campos et al (2000)

 

Key words: baby, babies, acquisition, teaching, learning, babbling, language, babbling, cooing,

 

 

11 – Too old to learn? The Critical Period – Heather Marsden

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MOT critical period

This episode, I speak to University of York’s Heather Marsden about the controversial Critical Period hypothesis. This theory suggests that there is a limited age at which we can learn a second language, after which it grows increasingly difficult. Anecdotally, we assume this to be true – kids are sponges for language while older people struggle – but what does the research say about this?

This episode is simply a bite-sized introduction to a much larger topic, so I encourage you to search around for other perspectives on this subject.

Heather Marsden @ University of York

Follow me on @MOTcast

Now on Instagram!

Noob glossary:

L1 – first/native language

L2 – second language

input – any exposure to the L2

interference – where the L1 grammar, vocab or pronunciation affects or negatively influences L2 production